2018 SUMMER READING LIST

With the summer heat reaching in excess of 110 degrees, many of us have been forced inside or we’ve packed the car and are headed to the beach.  In either case, it’s  always a great idea to have a good book near by.   We have three reading suggestions that we think will enrich your reading experience.  Each book is guaranteed to inspire and motivate you to be your very best self.

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BOOK REVIEWS

OPTION B
After the unexpected passing of her beloved husband, Facebook COO and bestselling author of Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg, feared that she and her children would never find joy again. Fortunately this fear was unfounded. Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy–co-authored with psychologist and friend Adam Grant–shows you how Sandberg, and many others who have overcome a wide range of profound hardships, triumphed over tragedy. The book posits that it’s helpful to think of resilience like a muscle, one that atrophies in the calm between the storms of our lives. But there are things we can do to develop it, so we’re better prepared when adversity strikes. In America, culture can put a kink in this plan. Processing a painful event can be hindered when you’re wired not to talk about it. We all know that when someone asks how we’re doing, the expected response is “fine,” no matter if we’ve just lost a limb, or had a cancer scare. We will grin, and we will bear it, and we will go back to work too soon and burst into tears in the copy room when confronted by a malevolent stapler (or maybe that’s just me). Recently, Sandberg helped to enact a new employee benefit at Facebook: 20 days of paid bereavement leave, twice the amount that was offered previously. As she explains in Option B, it’s the humane thing to do, and it also makes good business sense; compassionate companies engender more loyal employees. In this way, Option B is more than a little revolutionary. It challenges us to change systems that don’t always take our humanness into account. And that’s something we need to do on a personal level as well. None of us are immune to misfortune and heartbreak. We need to cut ourselves some slack when times get tough, and, as Sandberg discovered, flip the golden rule: When a loved one is in distress, instead of treating them how you would want to be treated, consider how they want to be treated, which may be quite different. Option B starts an (oftentimes) uncomfortable but important conversation. If we lean in to the numerous lessons it has to offer, there’s a lot more joy to be found. –Erin Kodicek, The Amazon Book Review

STROKE OF INSIGHT
“Transformative…[Taylor’s] experience…will shatter [your] own perception of the world.” –ABC News

“[Dr. Taylor] brings a deep personal understanding to something she long studied: that the two lobes of the brain have very different personalities.”
The New York Times

“Fascinating…invaluable…fearless…This book is about the wonder of being human.”
-Robert Koehler, Tribune Media Services

 

DARING GREATLY
“The brilliantly insightful Brené Brown draws upon extensive research and personal experience to explore the paradoxes of courage: we become strong by embracing vulnerability, we dare more greatly when we acknowledge our fear. I can’t stop thinking about this book.”
—Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project

“A wonderful book: urgent, essential and fun to read. I couldn’t put it down, and it continues to resonate with me.”
—Seth Godin, author of Linchpin

“In Daring Greatly, Brené Brown refers to herself as both a mapmaker and a traveler. In my book, that makes her a guide. And I believe the world needs more guides like her who are showing us a wiser way to our inner world. If you’d like to set your course on being more courageous and connected, engaged and resilient, leave the GPS at home. Daring Greatly is all the navigation you’ll need.”
—Maria Shriver

*As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.*

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